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(This is another of my speculative pieces and nothing to do with Star Wars. This one is for an older trilogy.)


Old Tom Bombadil. Possibly the least liked character in The Lord of the Rings. A childish figure so disliked by fans of the book that few object to his absence from all adaptations of the story. And yet, there is another way of looking at Bombadil, based only on what appears in the book itself, that paints a very different picture of this figure of fun.

What do we know about Tom Bombadil? He is fat and jolly and smiles all the time. He is friendly and gregarious and always ready to help travellers in distress.

Except that none of that can possibly be true.

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( 244 comments — Leave a comment )
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pingback_bot
Jan. 1st, 2012 07:31 pm (UTC)
Interesting perspectives on Tom Bombadil and villainy
User alexx_kay referenced to your post from Interesting perspectives on Tom Bombadil and villainy saying: [...] holiday parties, with me defending his importance to the story of LotR. And then sent me this link [...]
(Anonymous)
Jan. 4th, 2012 12:47 pm (UTC)
See, I just thought he was a bully and a coward.

Bright blue his jacket is and his boots are /yellow/.

No one's ever caught him yet, for Tom he is the master
His words are /stronger words/ and /his feet are faster/.

Says horrid things and runs away. That's Tom.
nines19
Jan. 6th, 2012 03:37 pm (UTC)
That's the best fan theory I have ever heard in my entire life.
gandolforf
Jan. 6th, 2012 05:39 pm (UTC)
Saw this floating around on Tumblr. You have some very good points!
synergyfox
Jan. 8th, 2012 04:52 am (UTC)
I love this interpretation and the speculations brought forth.
goobermunch
Jan. 8th, 2012 08:22 pm (UTC)
Pleased to meet you, hope you guess my name.
(Anonymous)
Jan. 9th, 2012 03:29 am (UTC)
Interesting interpretation, but I doubt it....
Your interpretation is interesting, but I think you're forgetting a very important piece of Tolkien's Lore:

According to the Ainulindalë there was NO discord or darkness in Aman or Valinor before Melkor corrupted the song of creation. This completely rules out any possibility of Tom being some forgotten evil force. If darkness and evil were the doing of Melkor during the song of creation, that means Tom would have had to be created BY Melkor and he is NOT "Oldest and Fatherless." However if Tom was a dark or evil presence that existed before the creation of the world, then that would mean the song of creation itself was dissonant and corrupted BEFORE Melkor came along, which directly conflicts with Tolkien himself.
(Anonymous)
Jan. 10th, 2012 02:01 pm (UTC)
Fantastic final paragraph
Brilliant image.
kalimac
Jan. 11th, 2012 12:31 am (UTC)
Thank you for this glimpse into the works of that alternative-world author "Tolkein", whoever that might be.
dalegardener
Jan. 11th, 2012 06:14 pm (UTC)
That's some really interesting and enjoyable speculation there. :-)
(Anonymous)
Jan. 17th, 2012 02:56 am (UTC)
Trickster
Or he could be Tolkien's take on that timeless mytheme, the "trickster" god. The Norse call him Loki and the Romans Pan. He goes by hundreds of names among the Hindus. Many of the features of the Christian devil as represented from the Middle Ages onward derive from this pre-Christian motif. Amoral, fun-loving, and occasionally malevolent, the "trickster" tends to associate with dark deities and is (as with Pan) often linked with nature and worshiped in groves.
elisson1
Jan. 17th, 2012 03:52 am (UTC)
Tom
Tom Bombadildo?

Me, I liked old Tom about as much as I liked Jar Jar Binks... which is to say, "not so much."
(Anonymous)
Jan. 17th, 2012 10:59 am (UTC)
Another interpretation. . .
That's not too different from my own interpretation, but it arrives at a different conclusion. For perspective, it's necessary to remember who Gandalf was and that both Gandalf and Aragorn knew who Bombadil was. Gandalf was a Maia, the same race as the Balrog and Sauron. My own conclusion is that Bombadil was Ea, the father of the Valar, the only one in the stories including "The Silmarrilion" who could be considered 'eldest and fatherless.' Once Gandalf's task of ridding Middle Earth of Sauron was done, Bombadil is who he reported to.
(Anonymous)
May. 31st, 2012 07:24 am (UTC)
Re: Another interpretation. . .
You have another brilliant theory going right there! :)
(Anonymous)
Jan. 19th, 2012 11:48 pm (UTC)
Wow
And again wow. Very enjoyable reading, thanks.

Chris
skreidle
Jan. 30th, 2012 06:32 pm (UTC)
Might want to edit to re-spell "Tolkien" a time or three. :)
km_515
Feb. 5th, 2012 09:25 am (UTC)
Good point. Fixed now.
(no subject) - skreidle - Feb. 5th, 2012 05:31 pm (UTC) - Expand
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( 244 comments — Leave a comment )